Wombat : Giant prehistoric animal found in Australia

Wombat : Giant prehistoric animal found in Australia

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Paleontologists Australia managed to lift the bones of prehistoric animals or giant wombat in Burkettown giant marsupials, Carpentaria region, southwestern Gulf of Queensland, last week.Known as a diprotodon and likened to a giant wombat, weighing three tons and stretching up to 14ft long, it roamed the Australian continent between 25,000 and two million years ago.

giant wombat found Wombat : Giant prehistoric animal found in Australia

What is known, from a fragment of bone from the remains of another diprotodon discovered in New South Wales, is that these creatures lived on the continent at the same time as the early Aborigines.

In a statement released Wednesday (07/06/2011), the scientists declared the bones were arguably the most complete for similar animals.

Animals named Diprotodon was a giant. Based on the bones were found, Diprotodon estimated height of 2 meters and 3.5 meters long, about the size of a rhinoceros or a car and shaped like a wombat, the typical animals of Australia.

Weight Diprotodon estimated at 3 tons and is believed to be the largest marsupial animal that ever lived. Herbivore that lived 2 million to an estimated 50,000 years ago.

Although artists have painted what scientists believe would be images of the diprotodon, the discovery of the complete skeleton will help in revealing more of the creature’s shape and size.

article 2011107 02AB2D800000044D 934 634x411 Wombat : Giant prehistoric animal found in Australia

‘This here in Queensland was its last stand, judging by the relatively undamaged complete skeleton.’

Professor Archer said it was unusual for all the bones of ancient creatures to be found in one place.

Together with other Australian megafauna, such as giant kangaroos and crocodiles, along with the emergence of Diprotodon extinct indigenous tribe. That sparked a debate about the role of humans in the extinction of ancient animals.

“There is much debate about the causes of extinction of the megafauna and became a hot topic in the world of paleontology,” said Sue Hand, one of the scientists involved in the discovery Diprotodon.

Although artists have painted what scientists believe would be images of the diprotodon, the discovery of the complete skeleton will help in revealing more of the creature’s shape and size.

‘What we’re seeing here is the biggest marsupial (an animal that carries its young in a pouch) that ever lived in the world – a three-ton monster,’ said Professor Archer.

‘This here in Queensland was its last stand, judging by the relatively undamaged complete skeleton.’

Professor Archer said it was unusual for all the bones of ancient creatures to be found in one place.

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